Unbc Faculty Association Collective Agreement

“I think only a person who doesn`t understand the importance and importance of respecting all employees would make such an offer,” he said. “How could they have imagined that the faculty would accept this agreement?” “I think it`s fair to say that the employer tried to divide our members. The unanimous vote of confidence that its members gave this morning to the UNBCFA bargaining team should send a strong message to the employer that this type of cascade will only strengthen our determination to obtain a sectoral collective agreement. Dana Wessell Lightfoot, an associate professor of history, said the offer “threatens to destroy collaborative relationships between full-time teachers, session instructors, librarians, senior instructors, employees and students.” “We need to reach a normal industry collective agreement because it is so important to the long-term sustainability of a university that we love it so much,” Rader concluded. The collective agreement between UBC and the UBC Faculty Association is the legal document that protects your rights and governs your work as an employee of UBC. Its terms are negotiated between the university administration and the association of faculties and are in force until the ratification of a new agreement. It regulates many of the conditions of your work at UBC. “Delays of any kind in collective bargaining are regrettable,” said Stephen Rader, FA President. “But we are now reaching a point of no return for the semester, and we are very worried about our students.” In January 2020, the bargaining teams for UBC and the Faculty Association met for a new contract for the period from July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2022. A set of information was published for members (available on our bargaining blog) and the collective agreement was ratified by both parties in February 2020.

A compendium of the agreement was also published. It has been said that, in order to secure funding for research from the federal government, UNBC has a justice, diversity and inclusion plan for research chairs, but not for the faculty in general, a situation that Dana Wessell Lightfoot, a professor of gender studies, called “alarming.” Full-time math teacher Brian Schaan received resounding applause. . . .